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Make-Up Air Systems

 

 

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KITCHEN VENTILATION SYSTEMS

Controls/Energy Management

Greenheck offers a wide range of electrical controls to power the exhaust and supply fans used for your kitchen exhaust needs including a Kitchen Fan Control Center (KFCC) and four types of variable volume systems.

Kitchen Fan Control Center (KFCC)

KFCC Control Center Greenheck's Kitchen Fan Control Center, Model KFCC, is designed to control the exhaust fans, supply fans, and lights for the kitchen ventilation system. The KFCC is interlocked with the fire suppression system. It signals the make-up air unit to shut down upon activation of the fire suppression system. The panel will also activate the kitchen exhaust fan(s) if they are off. The panel has two sets of dry contacts that can be used to signal a shunt trip breaker (supplied by others) or an electric gas valve (supplied by others) for appliance and outlet shutdown. A spare set of contacts is provided for connection to the building fire alarm. Greenheck's KFCC is UL listed and available in single phase or three phase configurations. The enclosure is 18 gauge 304 stainless steel and available in various sizes with three mounting options.

Kitchen Fan Control Center (KFCC) with Make-Up Air (775 k)

For a traditional system using a KFCC to start exhaust fans, lights, and make-up air the following diagrams illustrate the necessary electrical connections from the main power breakers to all individual components.

Variable Volume

A variable volume system will allow the exhaust and supply units to ramp up and down depending on the cooking load, allowing the system to operate at peak efficiency. In some cases, a variable system can reduce the costs associated with conditioning make-up air by up to 50%. There are four types of variable volume systems ranging from a manual set-up to an advanced control system with multiple sensors.

Control System for 3-phase motors with variable speed - temperature sensors

  • Temperature sensor in the duct collar as input device
  • Exhaust and supply speeds vary with the temperature
  • Fire system warning alarm tripped at a set temperature
  • Fire system activated which also turns off supply fan
  • 100% override to high speed
  • Variable frequency drives (exhaust and supply)

The simple control system varies the frequency of the motor drives according to the temperature seen in the duct collar. Instead of high or low, this system will run at the optimum performance.

Control System - temperature and optic sensors

  • Temperature sensor in the duct collar as input device
  • Exhaust and supply speeds vary with the temperature
  • Photoelectric sensor in capture area (for cooking surges)
  • Variable Frequency Drives (VFD) ramp to high with smoke density increase
  • Fire system warning alarm tripped at a set temperature
  • Fire system activated which also turns off supply fan
  • 100% override to high speed
  • Variable frequency drives (exhaust and supply)

The advanced control system varies the frequency of the motor drives according to the temperature seen in the duct collar, and it uses a photoelectric sensor to detect smoke density. Once the photoelectric beam is broken caused by a surge in the cooking effluent, the system will ramp to 100% instantly for a set period of time. The system will return to the speed at which the temperature dictates when the smoke has been removed. This system can be overridden to 100% and can be linked to the fire system.

Advanced Variable Volume System

  1. I/O Processor: Controls the lights, fans, and up to four hoods. It communicates to the electronic motor starters (VFDs) and can be manipulated using the keypad.
  2. Electronic Motor Starter (VFD): Receives a start/stop command and a 4-20ma signal from the I/O processor. It varies the fan motor speed between a minimum and maximum setting.
  3. Keypad: Provides daily operation functions and setup features.
  4. Temperature Sensor: Located in the duct collar behind the filters, it monitors the duct temperature. A signal is then transmitted to the I/O processor in order to vary the fan speed in proportion to the actual heat load.
  5. Optic Sensors: Monitor when actual cooking is taking place. After a 7% reduction is detected a signal is sent to the I/O processor to bring the fan motor to full speed until all the effluent is exhausted.

Variable Volume Payback Analysis

  • CFM reduction: Typically ranges from 10% to 50% of design volume
  • Hood operating hours: Typically ranges from 12-24 hours per day, or 4,380 - 8,760 hours per year
  • Average energy costs: $2 per cfm/year can be used for estimating conditioning make-up air costs

Variable Volume Arrangement (739 k)

Variable Volume Arrangement 2 (111 k)

For kitchen ventilation systems utilizing a energy management system that varies the exhaust and supply rates, the following diagrams illustrate the necessary electrical connections between the variable frequency drives, exhaust fans, make-up air, hood lights, and main power breakers.

 

Temperature Interlock

Temperature InterlockGreenheck’s temperature interlock is designed and installed to automatically activate the exhaust fan, if not manually started, whenever cooking operations occur. The activation of the exhaust fan shall occur through a temperature probe that detects an increased temperature and activates the fans. Greenheck offers a stand-alone package as well as an option on our fan control center (KFCC). Stand alone package features:

  • Thermostat with adjustable temperature setting
    Factory mounted in exhaust collar
    Shipped loose for field installations for ship loose collars
    J-box with open back and cover
  • 8 inch x 8 inch x 4 inch relay box
    Single Pole Double Throw (SPDT)  relay 1-100 minute time delay
    Terminal strip
    Typical mounting locations
    • Hood top
    • Utility cabinet (Hood or Remote)
    • Utility Distribution System
    • Remote
  • Optional Switches
  • Meets IMC code 507.2.1.1
  • UL Listed to 508

Relay Box

Greenheck’s relay box is compact, prewired and offers a low cost method of starting one or two fan motors. The relay box can be used in place of larger, more expensive starters when supply and exhaust must operate from one switch.

Standard construction features

  • Prewired from factory
  • Wiring diagram included in control box
  • Interface to shut off supply fan in fire mode is included
  • Painted 8 X 8 X 4 UL box - NEMA-3R

Mounting locations

  • Fire Cabinet
  • Wall
  • Above Hood
  • On hood - UL bolts

Available switch mounting locations

  • Hood
  • Fire Cabinet
  • Remote
  • Water Wash Control Panel
  • Utility Distribution System

Requirements

  • All motors must have thermal overloads
  • 2 fans maximum, both operating from one switch (More than 2 fans use KFCC without thermal overloads)
  • Each fan must have it’s own power source

Limitations

No additional options

  • Exhaust on in fire not available

Downloadable Greenheck Literature
Viewable with the Adobe Acrobat Reader
(Click here for more information or to download the Acrobat reader)

Catalog:
Variable Volume Ventilation System (581k)
Kitchen Fan Control Center (72k)
Application and Design Guide

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